An Open Letter To Judge Gorcyca

For reference: The Tsimhoni Case and Justice for Tsimhoni Children

Dear Judge Gorcyca,

You don’t know me. Not personally. But I know you. Allow me to introduce myself. I am Mother.

I know the profile of an abuser, and you fit that profile.

In June of 2009, U.S. Attorney General, Eric Holder, posed this question to the National Summit on the Intersection of Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment, “Do children need a relationship with their fathers even when their fathers have been abusive to them in the past? If so, what does that relationship look like?”

I’ll tell you what it looks like, Your Honor. An abuser threatens his victim. He tells her that he’ll take her children away if she doesn’t submit. In order to break her mentally and physically, an abuser will drag out conflict oftentimes after his victim has already worked hard all day, denying her rest, knowing she’ll need to wake early to care for her children, this being the eleventh hour. Abusers thrive on conflict, violence, and abuse. It sustains them. They tell their victim to remain silent about the abuse or suffer the consequences. They isolate their victim from a supportive network of friends and family. The abuser demands love and respect, and if those demands go unmet, then the abuser will take drastic measures to ensure obedience, using their position of privilege and power to manipulate, subdue, and control.

You said you wanted something drastic to happen to fix Maya Tsimhoni’s family. You knew full well that a family torn apart by abuse could never be whole again. You knew, but you didn’t care. You saw a fat checking account, and like an abuser in the eleventh hour, you dragged out the conflict for years because litigation incurring fees of a half a million dollars or more is of greater value than justice. You thrive on that conflict. It sustains you.

You forced Maya Tsimhoni’s children to have lunch with and to maintain a loving relationship with a father whose abuse has been documented. You slammed that gavel down, and when the Tsimhoni children refused to obey, you handcuffed and imprisoned them. And like the abuser who threatens his victim with the loss of her children, you threatened Maya Tsimhoni saying that if she violated your orders, you would imprison her children again.

Abusers isolate their victims, cutting them off from supportive and loving connections like friends and family. You tore children from a loving, primary caretaker and isolated them from each other, imprisoning them all and severing their supportive network in order to break them down and ensure submission.

Silence allows abuse to thrive, and so you put a gag order in place. You also sealed Maya Tsimhoni’s response to her abuser’s motion for custody. You said you were concerned about the Tsimhoni children’s privacy, but one does not place children in handcuffs to ensure their protection. No, you needed to conceal the overreach of the family court and your abuse of power; to hide from the world the human rights violations and child abuse being carried out by those working in family courts who profit financially from abused women and children. Silence hides abuse and this allows for its continuation. I, Mother, am not fooled by your actions.

So while you don’t know me Judge Gorcyca, I know you very well. I lived with you for many years. I documented your abuse. I spoke out against your abuse. I protected my children. I fought you for custody. I know your strategy.

I am Mother. I am the 58,000 women a year who have faced your courtroom bias. I am the protective parent fighting for my children. I am the activist effecting legislative change and educating others. And though you steal my voice with your gag order, know that where I am silenced thousands more speak in my place.

We are many. We are united.

And justice will prevail.

Mother

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58 thoughts on “An Open Letter To Judge Gorcyca”

    1. What a fantastic and perfectly woven letter!

      I recently attended my 10th court case withy ex abuser and even had a Gofund Me campaign funds for ( It was called levels the playing fields)

      Your message is so important and I would be glad to help champion your efforts!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you. I wrote the letter to raise awareness for the protective parents who have found themselves in Maya’s shoes. Maya and her children could use your support. If anyone is interested, a campaign has been started to help Maya Tsimhoni pay her legal fees. Please see the Justice for Tsimhoni Children’s Facebook page for details.

        Like

        1. This is a fantastic letter, but did you actually sent this letter? I think it would be very effective if many letters like this were sent to the judge in the court where she resides.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. This is the best letter I have ever seen. I cried. I have been going through my mess since 2006 and I have lost 1 child so far and have been trapped in a town I had never been to hundreds of miles from my family. I am not allowed to even leave the town I am in while my ex has complete control. I have reached out to so many and got a letter back from the judicial committee after I filed a complaint that showed they did not even read the complaint or look into the corruption here or on my case. I feel broken and I am not sure what else to do. I fear we will not see my family again.

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      1. Michele, I’m so sorry this has happened to you and your children. Do try to stay positive. I know it must be difficult. Take care of yourself. I know the grief must be overwhelming. Allow yourself a few moments a day to grieve and then move forward. You will need to be strong and healthy in order to help your child heal. There are links in my posts on DV that can connect you with wonderful support groups and these groups can help you make it through these difficult times. Sending positive thoughts and hugs.

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    3. Thank you for this great letter. Going through hell right now with my fiance’s ex who is using CPS, a 4 year old, and family court to harass us and break up our family. He has a history of abuse. We do not. But he “beat us to court” as our lawyers say.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. She sounds like she’s been hurt by and abuser, so now everyone is wrong and wants to punish the judge, and the dad just happens to be part of her vengeance. Not all, in fact not most dads are abusers. In fact, there is no full research that bad husbands are also bad fathers. That’s the problem here, she wants to link them and it isn’t good for the kids. I get it that mother believes he sucked as husband, but why can’t it be left there?

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    1. Thank you for reading and commenting, StandUpCarlos. I appreciate your thoughts. First let’s dispense with a few preliminary statements so that we can advance this discussion. Let’s start with the “Not All *Insert Perceived Maligned Group Here* statement.” Remember, arguments prefaced by these statements dismiss the legitimacy of actual issues and prevent change.

      So to move forward with this discussion let’s issue this disclaimer for any commenters echoing the “Not all *perceived maligned group* argument”:

      • Not all men are rapists. Not all men are violent. Not all men are burglars. Not all men wear boxers. Not all men wear briefs. Not all men are intelligent. Not all men are idiots. Not all men are eloquent. Not all men are bungling buffoons. Not all men are afraid to be an ally. Not all men are homophobic. Not all men are racist. Not all white people. Not all, not all, not all. Okay. We’ve established that not all do or don’t.

      She sounds like she’s been hurt by an abuser.

      This comment carries more weight in support of my post than I guess you realize. I like to support my position with facts. Let’s review some from the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s website (http://www.thehotline.org/resources/statistics/).

      • 24 people per minute are victims of rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States. That’s over 12 million men and women a year!!!
      • 3 in 10 women and 1 in 10 men have experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner.
      • 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men are victims of intimate partner violence.
      • Intimate partner violence affects more than 12 million people a year.
      • From 1994 to 2010, 4 in 5 victims of intimate partner violence were women.

      And now this from the Federal Bureau of Investigation:

      • 11,766 U.S. women were killed by their husbands or boyfriends. These deaths outnumbered the number of people killed in terror attacks in the U.S. (3,073), U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan (2,002), and U.S. troops killed in Iraq (4,486). These figures are from 10 September, 2001 to 6 June, 2012.

      From these facts, it’s easy to come to the conclusion that a woman speaking out against intimate partner violence and family court bias has, at some point, herself been a victim. But here’s the rub, if I were one of these victims who lost custody of their children to their abuser due to family court bias, I wouldn’t be able to tell you would I, due to the gag order issued in the majority of these cases, cases which have been documented by The Women’s Coalition PAC in their complaint to the U.N. (accompanied by briefs from thousands of women worldwide).

      “She sounds like she’s been hurt by and abuser, so now everyone is wrong and wants to punish the judge, and the dad just happens to be part of her vengeance.”

      I believe those perpetrating family court bias, family court overreach, abuse of power, human rights violations and child abuse should be investigated and held accountable for their actions. They’re profiting off those who have suffered intimate partner violence and abuse. Protective parents (note the gender neutrality of this statement) should not lose custody of their children to abusers. Also, the correct term here is justice not vengeance.

      This brings us to your next point, for which we’ll consult the American Bar for some facts. Because facts. (http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publishing/cdv_enewsletter/custodymythsandcounter.authcheckdam.pdf)

      You said, “In fact, there is no full research that bad husbands are also bad fathers. That’s the problem here, she wants to link them and it isn’t good for the kids. I get it that mother believes he sucked as husband, but why can’t it be left there?”

      The problem with your statement is that there IS full research that abusive husbands are abusive fathers, and let’s not take a Duggar stance here and dismissively term abusive fathers as bad because there’s a difference. Call rape, rape. Call violence, violence. Enough of this dismissive terminology.

      “She wants to link abusive dads to being abusive fathers and it isn’t good for the kids.”

      Yes, protective parents rightfully link abusive partners to being abusive parents. Sucking as a partner is forgetting an anniversary or mixing whites with colors in the laundry. I’m not talking about sucky people here, I’m talking about intimate partner violence. These are crimes. Not mistakes. Not bad behavior. Not sucking. Good fathers don’t take mothers from their children.

      “Why can’t it be left there?”

      You’re asking me why protective parents can’t leave their children with abusers. Why do parents tell kids to look both ways before crossing the street? Why do we tell kids not to run with scissors? Why do we warn our children of stranger danger? Do you really need me to answer this question?

      I’ve copied and pasted these “not full research” studies for you below. Sources bracketed.

      • Studies show that 25-50% of disputed custody cases involve domestic violence. [S.L. Keilitz, National Center for State Courts, Domestic Violence and Child Custody Disputes: A Resource Handbook for Judges and Court Managers (1997); J.R. Johnston, High-Conflict Divorce, 4 Future of Children 165 (1994).]
      • Among false allegations, fathers are far more likely than mothers to make intentionally false accusations (21% compared to 1.3%) [Bala & Schuman, Allegations of Sexual Abuse When Parents Have Separated, 17 Canadian Family Law Quarterly 191-241 (2000).]
      • A wide array of studies reveal a significant overlap between domestic violence and child abuse, with most finding that both forms of abuse occur in 30-60% of violent families. [Appel & Holden, The Co-Occurrence of Spouse and Physical Child Abuse: A Review and Appraisal, 12(4) Journal of Family Psychology 578- 599 (1998).]
      • Abusive parents are more likely to seek sole custody than nonviolent ones… [American Psychological Association, Violence And The Family: Report Of The American Psychological Association Presidential Task Force On Violence And The Family, (1996), available at http://www.apa.org/pi/viol&fam.html%5D
      • …and they are successful about 70% of the time. [American Judges Foundation, Domestic Violence and the Court House: Understanding the Problem…Knowing the Victim, available at http://aja.ncsc.dni.us/domviol/page5.html%5D
      • Allegations of domestic violence have no demonstrated effect on the rate at which fathers are awarded custody of their children, nor do such allegations affect the rate at which fathers are ordered into supervised visitation. [(i.e. abusers win unsupervised custody and visitation at the same rate as nonabusers) Kernic, Monary-Ernsdorff, Koepsell & Holt, Children In The Crossfire: Child Custody Determinations Among Couples With A History Of Intimate Partner Violence 11(8) Violence Against Women, 991-1021 (2005).]
      • The American Psychological Association has noted the lack of data to support so-called “parental alienation syndrome,” and raised concern about the term’s use. [American Psychological Association, Violence And The Family: Report Of The American Psychological Association Presidential Task Force On Violence And The Family, (1996), available at http://www.apa.org/releases/passyndrome.html%5D Also note that PAS is not identified by the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders).
      • Children can experience “traumatic bonding” with a parent who abuses the child or their other parent, forming unusually strong but unhealthy ties to a batterer as a survival technique (often referred to as “Stockholm Syndrome”). Lundy Bancroft & Jay Silverman, The Batterer as Parent: Addressing the Impact of Domestic Violence on Family Dynamics, 39-40 (2002); Herman, Trauma and Recovery (1992).

      Thanks again for your comment Carlos.

      Like

      1. You made a lot of comments for which most is opinion , some from research. I am a victim too, but I try very hard not to punish those who are not part of the problem. And for you assertion about PA syndrome, I never used syndrome and I don’t associate the two, though most of you do. Trauma comes in many forms. and this “mother” abuses her children, emotionally, intellectually, and psychologically. It won’t matter how “evidence” I use, you won’t change your mind and I don’t intend to try. That would be wasting my time, which I have now done twice.

        Thanks for replying, no I won’t change my mind either. Statistics are just as much a matter of who and how they are collected, as in how they are interpreted.

        And no you don’t appreciate my thoughts, I caught the undertone. Other wise you wouldn’t have so engaged with the “preliminaries”. You are right now and you don’t ever intend to be wrong about anything, that was my first thought after reading your answer. So you win.

        Like

        1. PAS has been used against protective parents in case after documented case, hence I referenced it in my comment.

          Maya Tsimhoni has been cooperative throughout this case. Show me some documented proof that Maya has been abusive. There is documented evidence of the father’s abuse. You’ll find documents in this case in the references linked above.

          Where would you propose we start to end human rights violations in cases of child custody? Which victim cases should I be highlighting? Men in your state? Men in America? Men in the world? Your stance suggests an internalized fear of losing privilege and a defensiveness in regard to feminism and women’s rights. My stance reflects knowledge of the topic and a willingness to put aside gender to focus on the issue at hand. This post seeks to raise awareness for, resolve, and prevent the family court abuses outlined herein, of which you claim to be a victim so I’m uncertain as to why you take issue with this letter.

          Like

          1. Ms. Bowers: Parental Alienation Syndrome is quite real and is a common behavior of Narcissists. They use their children as a weapon by turning them against the other parent. It’s sick, but that’s what they do. And Narcissists can be both men and women. This is not a gender issue. This is a mental illness issue.

            (In fact, gender opposition is a feature of Narcissistic Personality Disorder. If you encounter someone who believes that all women are to blame, or that all men are to blame, you are likely dealing with a Narcissist.)

            Like

            1. PAS is considered junk or pseudo-science, and is routinely used against women in divorce cases where there is a history of IPV (intimate partner violence), and this has been widely documented. This abuse of women in family court has been reported to the UN who upon sending delegates to the US, concluded that the rights of women in this country are severely lacking and behind other developed countries.

              When the woman seeks to leave and as she is trying to protect her children from the abusive parent, charges of PAS are leveled against her. PAS is not recognized by the legal or medical community, however, parental alienation is recognized but not as a syndrome. Most children who are alienated by abusive parents experience Stockholm Syndrome in addition to severe depression and other medical and mental issues from being separated from a loving parent. (Addressed in the comments already).

              I’ve said repeatedly that this is not a gender issue (also already addressed in the comments) and have written for men who are victims of IPV.

              Like

    2. You are so wrong. A person who can abuse another human, will abuse any human he/she can. It’s about control and gaining worship, not about love. This isn’t about a bad husband. This is about a narcissist needing his fix. That fix is control, manipulation, and tyranny. That doesn’t stop at the spouse. In fact, any human will suffice.

      Educate yourself.

      Liked by 1 person

          1. I wrote a post titled Frying Pans and Rolling Pins: Male Victims of Rape and Domestic Violence and shared that with you earlier in our discussion. I understand that people need protection. At this point, your comments offer nothing new to this discussion and border on trolling. This will be my last response to you.

            Like

            1. troll2
              trōl/
              verb
              gerund or present participle: trolling

              1.
              informal
              make a deliberately offensive or provocative online posting with the aim of upsetting someone or eliciting an angry response from them.

              My aim was to point out how I viewed some and many of the comments posted here appear anti-male and there isn’t always abuse because someone said so.

              If you thought I am trolling then I will honor that opinion, and this will be my final post as well.

              The trollster.

              Like

    3. A “bad husband” is not the same as an abusive man. Until you have educated yourself about the difference you should refrain from making comments that you know nothing about.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you soooo much for bringing the truth in numbers to light.
    Yes. There is a campaign by abusers that “protective parents” are just trying to alienate them.
    Here is the truth of P.A.S..
    Dr. Richard Warshak did a study on adult and child intimacy. Meaning sexual relations. He believed this was a very natural situation. He went on to use P.A.S. which unless you read his study you don’t see why there is an emphasis by fathers in child custody.
    Warshak stated that mothers were responsible for children not wanting to be around the father (are you ready for this) by accusing the father of molestation.
    This is A GENDER BIASDED diagnosis.
    And unfortunately it has been the demise to so many children who were taught it was safe to tell someone and they would be protected.
    No. They are traumatized even more by being separated from the one situation they felt in. And I would not trust a foster home with anyone’s kids due to the mortality rate.
    In Texas more children die in foster care than at home with the abusers.
    This gender war initiated by a group of “mad dads” that have a lot of money and power has moved into the State Capitol to have bills changed that are not about children and their futures. But a protest of child support, etc.
    Now I’m watching as the legal games use P.A.S. , give children limited visits with the parent who tried to help their child after they disclosed any abuse.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was Gardner that did the association between adult and child intimacy. Dr. Warshak will actually tell the system that where there is domestic violence of any type, PAS does not apply. He has also noted that he has a very high number of clients that are abused woman who have lost custody of their children to their abuser. I am fairly confident that his Bridges reunification program was approached by the Tsimhoni participants but they were turned down…I can only assume that it’s because of the abuse involved because he will not take cases into the program where abuse exists.

      Thank you Kimberly Bowers for your detailed account of the pathetic state of our family court system.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I hope you guys can share more on the emotional impacts of children in these situations. And more on Legal Abuse which Karin Huffer wrote about. There is a growing number of people with P.T.S .D. from vexatious litigation, going broke financially, your name and history slandered by the plaintiffs lawyers, etc.
          I also want to note that another term is being used in order to describe the mental health results.
          Terroristic Divorce. Its a stategy used by high powered unethical lawyers that debilitates a person to a state of trauma with anxiety, and major depression.
          Anne Drake has an amazing blog on Word Press. Once a powerful lawyer at the top of her game and married to a powerful judge. She had endured the type of physical and psychological abuse that is never shared. When one with money and power in a political position is called upon by authorities. The victim has just played roulette that the right actions will be taken. 90 % of the time this does not happen. Just like any type of crime committed by the rich and powerful. Anne’s calls only brought her one step closer to a bullet in the head.
          She finally left and had to go on disability due to loss of her entire being. And no one holding the abuser accountable.
          How common is this?
          I can tell you first hand that money buys justice. These men or women have the system behind them. Once there crimes are “dismissed in the name of justice”. You the defendant are left feeling even more fear. Our system is full of contamination. The people are aware of it. Donald Trump is not a real candidate for President. Or capable. The corrupted leaders, the loss of economic balance and now the division of classes and races. Were tired of the actors on stage working for money not the people.
          Just like this case.
          There is a large population of people who see Judges are immune to prosecution.
          Or, were.
          Finally the shame of dirty law is exposed.
          In Texas former governor Rick Perry’s case is still open and we are watching. Now our new Attorney General Paxton has been indicted.
          The last thing I say is. Time steals our chance to heal with our children. The courts drag these out as long as they can.
          And the child is emotionally resistant to you. Or they are adults and not interested.
          We lose more than our homes and friends.
          We miss the gifts of Christmas mornings, school pictures and plays. Holding them when they hurt over a first crush. All the stuff that is taken for granted.
          Keep up the good work.
          Our kids need rescue. They need a community for them. Not a systen cashing them in.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Just curious if any of the commenters have been in a divorce situation where one parent withholds a child from the other parent simply out of vengeance or for the sake of control? (absent of abuse, I understand the difference)

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Carlos, withholding a child from a loving parent is abuse. In domestic violence cases, children are used by the perpetrator against the victim to ensure submission and obedience (if you leave, I’ll take away your children). Abuse may not always be physical. Some people experience emotional abuse from their partners and this can be as damaging as intimate partner violence. If this is what you’re experiencing, I urge you to document everything and get help.. https://kimberlybowers.wordpress.com/2015/08/31/frying-pans-and-rolling-pins-male-victims-of-domestic-violence/

              Like

              1. It was never that simple, and I didn’t leave, she did. But the effect was the same. She didn’t get all she wanted in a divorce so the vengeance begins. And yes abuse is abuse, some women and men do routinely use it as their ally in a divorce. That is why the assumption that any father is an abuser, has to be carefully investigated, simply a child’s word or mother’s word may not be enough, and honestly shouldn’t be the only evidence. Very very tricky situation on both sides.

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                  1. I beg to differ with you. That is patently false and I know it because my son said I did, and I never ever have. Ever. But my ex did and I made the mistake of never using that. Sad that women pretend to ignore the research on abuse of men. No wonder there isn’t justice.

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                  2. I will also agree that “protective parents” in losing custody allegations aren’t thoroughly investigated as is not the alleged abuser. When parents make that charge falsely, that person should be incarcerated immediately. I support equal protection of both parents not just a woman, I support both parents having equal custody in the case where neither parent is abusing the child. I don’t support keeping either parent away from a child when abuse is ONLY between the adults, and I realize all abuse isn’t the same, and have personal values of NO abuse is acceptable.

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                    1. I only saw your reply “have a nice day” after I posted my comments. Now I get what you (and some others) are really about. It isn’t justice in the sense of what is good and correct for a child and a parent or people, but SOLEY for the woman. My mistake, I misinterpret people occasionally. Have a good day yourself Ms. Bowers.

                      Like

  3. Ms. Bowers:

    I agree with you that this judge’s conduct is abusive. She should be removed from the bench.

    However, I don’t know enough about this case to conclude that the father is abusive. Much of what gets “documented” in Family Court cases is manipulative fantasy–it’s all part of the circus of the abusive court system you describe. False allegations are the oxygen of custody disputes. Perjury is never prosecuted.

    Also, the information that has come to light indicates that the mother is most likely engaging in parental alienation. Women are just like as likely to be abusers as men. This judge is an example of that, and the gag order she imposed is further confirmation.

    So let’s wait for more information to come out before jumping to conclusions about the parties in this case. But by all means, remove the judge now.

    Like

    1. Two of the Tsimhoni children witnessed their father abusing their mother. A spouse who is abusive to his/her partner is incapable of being a loving, protective parent. A wide array of studies reveal a significant overlap between domestic violence and child abuse, with most finding that both forms of abuse occur in 30-60% of violent families. 3 Appel & Holden, The Co-Occurrence of Spouse and Physical Child Abuse: A Review and Appraisal, 12(4) Journal of Family Psychology 578-599 (1998). Other studies have shown intimate partner violence (“IPV”) to be a strong predictor of child abuse, increasing the risk from 5% after one act of IPV to 100% after 50 acts of IPV.S.M. Ross, Risk of Physical Abuse to Children of Spouse Abusing Parents, 20(7) Child Abuse & Neglect 589-98 (1996)].

      Even after being separated from their mother by the father and Judge Gorcyca, the Tsimhoni children have maintained that they wish to return to their mother. The mother has been denied contact with her children and this is an abuse of power, further, it’s not in the best interests of those children to remove them from the custody of a loving parent, who has no criminal history, no history of IPV, and no history of child abuse and who, prior to divorce, was the dominant nurturer and caregiver, let alone remove those children, in handcuffs while making threats to keep them incarcerated until their eighteenth birthday. Studies show that 25-50% of disputed custody cases involve domestic violence [S.L. Keilitz, National Center for State Courts, Domestic Violence and Child Custody Disputes: A Resource Handbook for Judges and Court Managers (1997); J.R. Johnston, High-Conflict Divorce, 4 Future of Children 165 (1994)].

      I’ve posted stats above, feel free to read them. I’ve also addressed the “not all men” argument and I’m absolutely sick of hearing this one. I appreciate your effort to school me on women’s rights, abuse of those rights, the family court system, and domestic violence, subjects I’ve been studying and writing on for eight years now. We can continue this discussion when you know more about the case.

      Like

      1. Studies show that 25-50% of disputed custody cases involve domestic violence.
        Yet statistics from Germany indicate that not only are 95% of abuse accusations made in divorce cases false, but DV laws tend to have lax- to nonexistent standards for evidence. It’s all very well to claim abuse happens in up to 50% of disputed custody cases, but the benefits of false accusations of abuse far outweigh the minimal punishments.

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    1. Wrong. 58,000 women a year are losing custody of their children, and this was recently documented and filed with the UN for human rights violations committed in the U.S. against women and children. Also, the American Bar Association published a piece for the Commission On Domestic Violence wherein they noted the following stats on divorce:

      *Abusive parents are more likely to seek sole custody than nonviolent ones and they are successful about 70% of the time.

      *Allegations of domestic violence have no demonstrated effect on the rate at which fathers are awarded custody of their children, nor do such allegations affect the rate at which fathers are ordered into supervised visitation. (i.e. abusers win unsupervised custody and visitation at the same rate as non-abusers).

      *False allegations are no more common in divorce or custody disputes than at any other time. Among false allegations, fathers are far more likely than mothers to make
      intentionally false accusations (21% compared to 1.3%)

      *Mental illness is found only in a minority of batterers.

      *According to the ABA, mother’s do not always get custody. This is a divorce/custody myth.

      Like

  4. Pingback: My mom believed me

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